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Sunday, June 21, 2009

DHT questions for chapter one

“We believe our generation is ready to rethink what teens are capable of doing and becoming.” With that statement, the authors set the stage for a discussion about doing things differently. Then they identify the unique angle of Do Hard Things: instead of being a book where adults tell teens how to change, it’s a conversation
among teens who are ready to lead the way. Alex and Brett talk briefly about their background and reasons for writing the book. They want teens to rebel against low expectations and reclaim the full potential of their teen years.

1)As you read the inside flaps of the book and the first chapter, how did you react to the authors’ talk about change, hard things, and “rebelution”?

2) Usually we try to look to older (hopefully wiser) people for life advice. Do you see any risks when teenagers—in this case, two nineteen year olds—try to persuade other young people to change how they think? On the other hand, what might be some advantages to the authors’ age?

3)“We don’t think ‘average teenagers’ exist,” write the twins. Do you feel average? If so, why? Does that ever feel like a good thing? If not, what is it that makes you feel not average?

4) The fictional Dundress monks were well intentioned but unhappy Christians who believed that more misery must mean more holiness. Have you ever thought that? Where do you think that kind of thinking comes from?

5) In what ways do you think popular culture misrepresents what the teen years are for? Can you think of one thing that would change if you and your friends believed—really believed—that low expectations were ripping
you off?

1 comments:

Anonymous said...

1)As you read the inside flaps of the book and the first chapter, how did you react to the authors’ talk about change, hard things, and “rebelution”?
-"Let's get going!"

2) Usually we try to look to older (hopefully wiser) people for life advice. Do you see any risks when teenagers—in this case, two nineteen year olds—try to persuade other young people to change how they think? On the other hand, what might be some advantages to the authors’ age?
-Well, we should still look to older and wiser people for advice. We don't want to change just for the sake of changing. We want to change the stuff that's not that great. If the authors had been 40, though, they might feel they were being preached at, regardless of the author's intent.

3)“We don’t think ‘average teenagers’ exist,” write the twins. Do you feel average? If so, why? Does that ever feel like a good thing? If not, what is it that makes you feel not average?
-No. Anyone that knows me knows I'm not average. I don't believe in 'normal' or 'average' people either. My life is aimed at pleasing God, not just having a good time.

4) The fictional Dundress monks were well intentioned but unhappy Christians who believed that more misery must mean more holiness. Have you ever thought that? Where do you think that kind of thinking comes from?
-I don't feel that way. I think it comes from a wrong understanding of God and grace.

5) In what ways do you think popular culture misrepresents what the teen years are for? Can you think of one thing that would change if you and your friends believed—really believed—that low expectations were ripping
you off?
-Well, to be honest, most of my culture consists of "Clean House" and HGTV. What I've seen of teen shows left me feeling dirty. It was mostly about crushes. >ick< If we ALL really believed that we were being ripped off, I think we could actually make real significant changes in the mindset of teens today. I've always wanted to be part of a revival and if we all stick to it, it might come true!